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Karl Denson

December 16th, 2004

Karl Denson, saxophonist par excellence, got his break from Lenny Kravitz, while doing a gig for a session player named Tony LeMans. Asked to solo on “Let Love Rule,“ Kravitz appreciated Denson’s work so much he asked for Denson to contribute to both Mama Said and Are You Gonna Go My Way, as well as both tours.

Then, in 1992, Denson got the chance to go his own way, parting company with Kravitz to join a stylish San Diego MC named DJ Greyboy and his band the Allstars. This union formed one of the most revolutionary combinations in acid jazz history.

Denson served as a saxophonist, flutist and singer, as well as one of the band’s leaders. Talented and passionate, Denson became a central figure in the acid jazz movement of the early 1990s.

“We were lucky enough to create a buzz with the Allstars right when dance music kind of shifted in our direction,“ Denson said. “Then it shifted back towards mainstream R&B and hip-hop…and kind of left us in the lurch. [So] we made a crossover into the hippie market.“

But, by 1997, the Greyboy Allstars had begun to grow apart. “The band stopped creating freely,“ says Denson. “So we took some time off. But the time off became longer and longer, until I just started my own thing.“

Denson’s “own thing,“ Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, is now available in the jazz sections of record stores across the country. Denson and his new band are currently on a national tour to support their album.

Denson has already shown that had can follow the formula. But now that he’s gotten the music world’s attention, how will he parlay that into a fancy platter of hors d’oeuvres?

“Attack the record companies,“ he declared. “Make ourselves more visible…push for a more vocal, mainstream appeal. I want to get on the radio. I think I write good enough tunes. I want a nice, fat budget so I can relax and make a record slowly, and make it right.“

Karl Denson, saxophonist par excellence, got his break from Lenny Kravitz, while doing a gig for a session player named Tony LeMans. Asked to solo on “Let Love Rule,“ Kravitz appreciated Denson’s work so much he asked for Denson to contribute to both Mama Said and Are You Gonna Go My Way, as well as both tours.

Then, in 1992, Denson got the chance to go his own way, parting company with Kravitz to join a stylish San Diego MC named DJ Greyboy and his band the Allstars. This union formed one of the most revolutionary combinations in acid jazz history.

Denson served as a saxophonist, flutist and singer, as well as one of the band’s leaders. Talented and passionate, Denson became a central figure in the acid jazz movement of the early 1990s.

“We were lucky enough to create a buzz with the Allstars right when dance music kind of shifted in our direction,“ Denson said. “Then it shifted back towards mainstream R&B and hip-hop…and kind of left us in the lurch. [So] we made a crossover into the hippie market.“

But, by 1997, the Greyboy Allstars had begun to grow apart. “The band stopped creating freely,“ says Denson. “So we took some time off. But the time off became longer and longer, until I just started my own thing.“

Denson’s “own thing,“ Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, is now available in the jazz sections of record stores across the country. Denson and his new band are currently on a national tour to support their album.

Denson has already shown that had can follow the formula. But now that he’s gotten the music world’s attention, how will he parlay that into a fancy platter of hors d’oeuvres?

“Attack the record companies,“ he declared. “Make ourselves more visible…push for a more vocal, mainstream appeal. I want to get on the radio. I think I write good enough tunes. I want a nice, fat budget so I can relax and make a record slowly, and make it right.“

press contact:
Guy Low
Manager, PR/Media

(952) 736-3935
guy.low@us.bosch.com
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